Jacob Rockowitz: Acquia, Automattic, and Microsoft should lobby governments to fix accessibility issues in Open Source

Recently, I nudged governments to get more involved in fixing accessibility issues in Open Source projects. Getting governments to do anything can feel like a monumental challenge. Maybe we need to build better alliances and then collectively lobby the governments to change how they approach Open Source.

Approach

Dries Buytaert, the founder of Drupal, recently published a blog post titled, “Balancing Makers and Takers to sustain and scale Open Source,” and while reading it I wondered, “Are we approaching the problem of sustainability too much as developers? Should we step back and look at the challenge of sustainability from a business and political perspective?”

Is changing an Open Source project’s license going to change how other organizations contribute to Open Source? Changing the licensing is a different approach. The recent “Open-source licensing war” felt like a few individual companies are trying to make a significant shift in Open Source, however lacking a unified front. If Open Source companies are going to take on Amazon, they are going to have to do it together by building alliances.

Alliances

The definition of alliance sounds very much like what happens in Open Source communities.

Political alliances (a.k.a. parties) are what powers most governments. The scale of some open source projects has required better governance. In Dries’ blog post, he spends time exploring how organizations use Open Source (a.k.a. Takers) without helping to build the software or community (a.k.a. Makers). His post ends with three valuable suggestions that are focused on appealing to organizations and rethinking how the Open Source…Read More